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Raider Aerospace Society Creates, Launches Model Rockets

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http://bandarjudibola.org/?protis=facebook-comme-site-de-rencontre&2b1=0a It was very much rocket science for members of the Texas Tech organization, Raider Aerospace Society, as they gathered in Lieutenant Colonel George Davis Park to build and launch sugar model rockets on Sunday afternoon, Sept. 17.

follow Derrick Slatton, a senior mechanical engineering major from Amarillo and president of Raider Aerospace Society, said the project was a basic introduction into rocketry.

https://dunkl.co.at/deposti/10789 The model rockets’ motors are made from a combination of sugar and potassium nitrate, Slatton said. The mixture is considered a slow burning fuel, and is good for beginners to use.

Then, there is the parachute system, Slatton said. The model rocket contains a mix of baking soda and gun powder, which allows the rocket to slow down after its launch. The gun powder will explode, putting pressure on the top of the rocket and deploying the parachute.

suprax 400 mgs Davis Hall, a junior mechanical engineering major from Flower Mound and vice president of Raider Aerospace Society, said the sugar model rockets are a much simpler version of expensive model rockets that can be bought in stores.

aricept flas 10 mg The project is a way to teach members the principles of model rocketry, and it allows them to make mistakes and correct them, Hall said.

coumadin 5 mg anwendungsgebiete “That’s kind of how engineering is,” he said. “It’s a lot of trial and error, but it’s very exciting.”

The sugar rocket event is the organization’s first project of the year, Hall said.

The organization was founded a year ago, Slatton said. When

 “We’re teaching the students how to calculate the center pressure, the center of gravity and where to position those relative to the design,” Slatton said.

Members began by designing the rocket’s profile. It was then balanced on a foam sheet to create the center pressure, Slatton said. The center of gravity is an experimental, or visual calculation as members have to figure it out by looking at the rocket.

Then, there is the parachute system, Slatton said. The model rocket contains a mix of baking soda and gun powder, which allows the rocket to slow down after its launch. The gun powder will explode, putting pressure on the top of the rocket and deploying the parachute.

Davis Hall, a junior mechanical engineering major from Flower Mound and vice president of Raider Aerospace Society, said the sugar model rockets are a much simpler version of expensive model rockets that can be bought in stores.

The project is a way to teach members the principles of model rocketry, and it allows them to make mistakes and correct them, Hall said.

“That’s kind of how engineering is,” he said. “It’s a lot of trial and error, but it’s very exciting.”

The sugar rocket event is the organization’s first project of the year, Hall said.

One of the teams at the events works on their rocket on Sunday, Sept. 17, 2017, at Lt. Col. George Davis Park. The Raider Aerospace Society gathered to design, build and launch rockets within the same day.
Katie Spradlin

The organization was founded a year ago, Slatton said. When he arrived at Tech, there were no organisations dedicated to aerospace.

 

 

”The project is a way to teach members the principles of model rocketry, and it allows them to make mistakes and correct them.”

In the beginning of the semester, the organization had about 37 members. Now, there are about 80 active members, and the number continues to grow as more students join.

“Once we hit 100 members, I plan to present it to the engineering board,” Slatton said,” and suggest we look at some aerospace classes, but the club is growing exponentially.”

The organization hopes to compete nationally in the NASA Student Launch Initiative soon, Slatton said. The Student Launch is a competitive, research based, experiential exploration activity that aims to provide relevant, cost-effective research and development of rocket propulsion systems, according to  follow www.nasa.gov.

Daphni Leonard, a freshman electrical engineering major from Haskell, said she joined the organization because it seemed like a good opportunity to learn and create connections for a future career.

Although aerospace is fairly new to her, it is interesting and she has already learned a lot, she said.

She did not know what to expect when she first joined the organization, but after attending the first meeting, she said the organization was very well structured with many future plans and schedules.

“It’s more than just meetings and volunteering, and I can tell that stuff is going to get done,” she said.

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